German 88 with Tank

“Contact! German 88 12 o’clock! 1000 yards!!!”, my mind screamed.

Driving down the highway today, I suffered one millisecond of World War II WTF. You see, I actually recognized the German 88 anti-aircraft gun from afar. Which may seem weird to the uninitiated, but the German 88 AA gun is huge and it sits very high off the ground. It wasn’t until I got closer that I saw the WWII German Tank!

This is more Freeze’s area, because I swear! One day he’s showing up at the office with a tank. So I will leave it up to him to positively ID this armor. I simply would be guessing. Looking closer at my computer, maybe it’s mobile artillery or a tank destroyer of some kind?

Rear axel of 88mm Anti-Aircraft gun.

Rear axel of 88mm Anti-Aircraft gun.

But then…isn’t that what the Germans used the 88’s for as well? Your guess is as good as mine. Leave your input below in the comments.

As for why? I don’t know if this was being moved for a military museum or for a private collection? When you’re the WWII undisputed champion, it’s hard keeping all those trophies organized.

The German 88 is huge. Look how much larger it is than the armor.

The German 88 is huge. Look how much larger it is than the armor.

We grabbed a lot of stuff from those Nazi suckers!

😉
Marky
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Marky Mark

Marky Mark

Writer at John1911.com
Writer for john1911.com. Co-Host of the John1911 Podcast. Video content provider for John1911-TV.

Areas of focus: Defense and National Security, Modern Light Weapons, Analysis of the Geo-political / Military Relationship in the Context of Strategic Goals.
Marky Mark

Latest posts by Marky Mark (see all)

  • Freeze

    Anyone know what model or variant this is. All the StuG’s I have seen sport 8 road wheels per side and this one is showing 7. Any help here is appreciated.

  • schmuzzy

    a conundrum! looks to be a very early Panzer III, Ausf. A chassis. my guess is one of two things- either the StuG conversion was done late in the war -where they took anything on hand and forced it into service (but then there probably wouldnt be a muzzle break)… or it was a modern combination of two salvaged vehicles.

    • I heard it was a re-pro built on a UK chassis of somekind.

      Marky

      • James Dallas Teel II

        It is a repro Stug on a Brit FV chassis.

  • Randy Shadoe

    The kill rings on the 88’s barrel are a nice touch!

    • I did not know that!

      Marky

      • Randy Shadoe

        Kill rings like that on big gun barrels that deliver direct fire are a tradition that, I believe, began with the Wermacht but has been adopted by other militaries. You may see some in photos of Abrams tanks in combat in Iraq.

        • Hmmm…I’ll be looking for that.

          Marky

          • Randy Shadoe

            There is a brief reference to the practice in the novel “Team Yankee.” I am a bit nostalgic about WW3, the so called “Cold War.” Too many graves, too many good men, on BOTH sides, in the ground to call it cold.

          • I have the book on a shelf somewhere. I should reread it. I too am a child of the Cold War.

            Marky

  • Brennen Munro

    Well that is not something you see every day! I can understand the wtf moment you had, just think how the guys seeing that thing during the war must have felt?! Thanks for posting these pictures!

    Munro

    • jeepers

      +1

  • Mikial

    It’s not a ‘tank’ per say, because it does not have a rotating turret. I would say it comes closest to a Sturmgeschütz III with the typical 5 road wheels. The Germans began building STUGs because they were cheaper and faster to build than tanks because they dispensed with the rotating turret and the necessary turret ring in the chassis, so they could build more of them. One thing to keep in mind is that people who refurbish and restore old vehicles, be they tanks or cars, have very different ideas of what they want, and as such exhibit a bit of ‘poetic license’ at times in what they finally end up with.faster.

    As for the 88, it was originally designed to be an AA gun and had excellent optics to support that. The optics combined with the high speed very flat trajectory round made it lethal at ranges far beyond what tanks of the day could achieve. It was first used in an anti-tank role on the Russian front when the Germans were confronted with the ‘new’ Soviet T34 that just seemed to drive right through everything they could throw at it. It was finally a desperate AA crew on an 88 that destroyed it and from then on the 88 was the preeminent German AT gun. Eventually they did develop dedicated AT versions that had a much lower silhouette than the dual purpose AA/AT versions. My father was a tanker in Italy in WWII and I actually have a n old photo of an 88 his unit knocked out. It was one of the dual purpose models like on the trailer in the picture. I’ll have to scan it in before I can post it, but in the meantime here is a picture of the dedicated AT version.