POTD — German Sniper with Russian Rifle

History is a funny thing. Here is a photo of some German snipers dated 25th April, 1945. Germany officially surrendered on May 7th.

When most modern gun collectors look at this image, they focus on the German G43 semi-automatic rifles. Or…are they G41’s? The earlier version? I don’t know as I am not an expert on that type of rifle.

But there is something interesting that most people miss. The 3rd man from the right is 100%, most defiantly, carrying a Russian Mosin Nagant Sniper. Not a German K98.

You take what you can get when you can get it.

Wars rarely, if ever, end cleanly.

Marky
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Marky Mark

Marky Mark

Writer at John1911.com
Writer for john1911.com. Co-Host of the John1911 Podcast. Video content provider for John1911-TV.

Areas of focus: Defense and National Security, Modern Light Weapons, Analysis of the Geo-political / Military Relationship in the Context of Strategic Goals.
Marky Mark

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  • MickeyG

    Wonder if it was a ‘war trophy’, or if he just liked it better than issue equipment?

    • Eh? In April of 1945, a German war trophy was probably saving your own ass.

      Marky

      • MickeyG

        :-), saving my ass was my 2nd priority, saving my men/team was my 1st !

        • Which is why you looked the other way on the unauthorized equipment.

          🙂

          Marky

  • Randy Shadoe

    Considering the late date, and the preponderance of scoped weapons, could these be some of Otto Skorzeny’s Schwedt division company of snipers tasked with slowing the Soviet invasion at the Oder crossing? Outnumbered some 15:1 they held their ground for 30 days. Skorzeny would later write, “I estimated that 25 percent of our defensive success was attributable to the snipers.”

    • I don’t know enough about that. I believe this photo was taken in it near Austria. Not sure why I think that.

      Marky