Rigarmi .25 Auto

I blame my late friend Pete Dickey for my addiction to cheap auto pistols and break-open revolvers. If these are so-called “Saturday Night Specials,” then every night was Saturday night at Pete’s. He had them made into bookends, lamps and all sorts of novelty gifts. His enthusiasm for, and he fun he had with them, was contagious.

This Rigarmi hold seven rounds.

This Rigarmi hold seven rounds.

As much a novelty as these guns are today, there are many of them that are well made and served dutifully as third guns or for deep concealment. I personally don’t think it makes a difference what cartridge these little guns are chambered for. They aren’t “stoppers,” but rather “get off me” guns where reliability trumps power.

The one I used to carry in my front pocket is a Rigarmi in .25 ACP. Why .25 ACP? No reason. It just had to work reliably, especially on contact shots. With its fixed barrel, blowback action, semi-rimmed cartridges and single-stack magazine, there’s not much that can go wrong and, as far as cheap old guns, it’s pretty well made.

Though little .25- and .22-cal. autos served their purpose “back in the day,” there are better guns on the market for deep concealment or third guns.

Though little .25- and .22-cal. autos served their purpose “back in the day,” there are better guns on the market for deep concealment or third guns.

My little .25 has since been replaced by my Kel Tec P3AT, It’s just as reliable, holds as many shots, and is pretty much the same size but its polymer construction makes it much lighter than the Rigarmi—not to mention being chambered for a significantly more powerful cartridge.

Even though there are expanding bullets for the .25 Auto, Scott prefers FMJ loads in the mousegun for the increased functional reliability and deeper penetration.

Even though there are expanding bullets for the .25 Auto, Scott prefers FMJ loads in the mousegun for the increased functional reliability and deeper penetration.

So as it was with Pete, so it is with me; the little .22 Short and .25 Auto pistols are more of a novelty to me today. They’re still fun to shoot, but there are better third guns on the market.

 

 

 

Scott Mayer

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www.john1911.com

“Shooting Guns & Having Fun”

Scott Mayer

Scott Mayer

Writer at John1911
Mayer began his outdoor industry career in 1993 on the NRA Technical Staff where he became American Rifleman magazine first Shooting Editor. Mayer left NRA and entered the business end of publishing in 2003 as Advertising Account Executive for Safari Club International SAFARI Magazine and Safari Times newspaper. In 2006, Mayer was named Publisher of Shooting Times magazine where he was also tasked with launching and leading Personal Defense TV, the first television show of its kind.

In 2008, Mayer returned to the editorial side of publishing, this time in the digital field, as Editorial Director for Guns & Ammo, Shooting Times, Handguns and Rifleshooter online magazines. After a brief stint in 2011 as the Digital Media Director for an ABC TV affiliate, Mayer returned to the outdoors industry and Safari Club International where he is currently Assistant Publisher and Multi-Media Communications Editor.
Scott Mayer

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  • Mikial

    I still have fond memories of my Raven .25ACP purchased for the astonishing price of $48 from a Gibson’s store in . . um, well, I think around 1980. My son still has it and loves the dumb thing.

    These days my “third guns(s) or for deep concealment” is a KelTec P32 with CorBons. But, there have been a couple of articles this week about these little “Saturday Night Special” .25s that have made me nostalgic to pick up another one . . . just for the fun of it.

    • A raven 25 was the first gun I ever took from someone on the street.

      Marky