Saw Cut vs Torch Cut

We’ve had some inquiries about the ZB-26 kit. Many of our younger readers haven’t seen saw cuts, or might not be aware that used to be an option? 

Long story short, there was  time when the BATFE would allow the importation of parts kits that were cut with bandsaws. But later on, they decided it was way too way to reactivate these kits into fully functional machine-guns. 


So…they changed the rules. Now…kits must be cut with a blowtorch. That cut must destroy 1/4” inch of metal. That really does a number on the receivers. The down side is many of these kits can’t be rebuilt without significant re-weld and metal construction.  Read money. And if the cut destroys an area that is mechanically significant or complicated, things turn out very badly. Read more money. 

The result is an adjustment by the market to start making US produced receivers and barrels. Something I believe benefits us all. (Can you tell I’m really trying to remain positive?) Because the US is a wealthy and technically skilled country. We can make anything we want. And likely make it better than the original. 

But as I am prone to do, I have digressed. 

So today we have two types of kits in the US. Older bandsaw kits, and later torch cut kits. Obviously the band cut kits bring more money and are slowly drying up. Which brings us to this ZB-26 kit and why we are so fortunate to have it. 

So…here are some closeup pics of the cuts and what an old style de-mill looks like. It wasn’t cheap. And is being reactivated by Matt over at LMG as I type. 

 

 

Sincerely, 

Marky

www.John1911.com

“Shooting Guns & Having Fun”

Marky Mark

Writer at John1911.com
Writer for john1911.com. Co-Host of the John1911 Podcast. Video content provider for John1911-TV.

Areas of focus: Defense and National Security, Modern Light Weapons, Small Arms, Weapons Training.
Marky Mark

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