The Dardick Revolver

The cartridge on the left is one you will probably never see outside of a serious ammunition collection or gun show. It’s called a “tround” and was invented by David Dardick for his Dardick Series 1100, 1500, and 2000 double-action revolvers. Introduction was at the 1957 NRA Annual Meetings. Instead of a brass cartridge case, the tround was plastic. It had a conventional primer, powder and bullet.

Dardick Tround

Dardick Tround

The case shape permitted trounds to be stacked efficiently in a box magazine that was inserted in the pistol grip of the revolver. The trounds fed up into a “cylinder” that had V-shaped notches into which the trounds seated. Guns were available in .38 or .22 caliber and there is some argument as to whether a total of 40 or 50 of the guns were made. The public was never overwhelmed by the tround, nor the Dardick revolver. It is, frankly, an ugly-looking gun. There have, however, been successful applications of tround technology reported in hard rock drilling and military gun applications.

Dardick Double Action Revolver

Dardick Double Action Revolver

Scott Mayer

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Scott Mayer

Scott Mayer

Writer at John1911
Mayer began his outdoor industry career in 1993 on the NRA Technical Staff where he became American Rifleman magazine first Shooting Editor. Mayer left NRA and entered the business end of publishing in 2003 as Advertising Account Executive for Safari Club International SAFARI Magazine and Safari Times newspaper. In 2006, Mayer was named Publisher of Shooting Times magazine where he was also tasked with launching and leading Personal Defense TV, the first television show of its kind.

In 2008, Mayer returned to the editorial side of publishing, this time in the digital field, as Editorial Director for Guns & Ammo, Shooting Times, Handguns and Rifleshooter online magazines. After a brief stint in 2011 as the Digital Media Director for an ABC TV affiliate, Mayer returned to the outdoors industry and Safari Club International where he is currently Assistant Publisher and Multi-Media Communications Editor.
Scott Mayer

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  • Brennen Munro

    Looking at that gun I am led to believe that Mr Dardick was a fan of the “Buck Rogers” school of design. I would think that after the designs of Luger, Colt, and Browning folks would have realized that how the gun looks has an influence on how it is accepted. I guess you can get so caught up in it being “your” design, that you lose track of just how truly ugly it is.
    Munro