Video — Don’t Flush Cut Your Pistol Barrel

Should you flush cut or recess cut the barrel on your pistol? From a practical standpoint, I am against this option completely.

 

Marky
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“Shooting Guns & Having Fun”

Marky Mark

Marky Mark

Writer at John1911.com
Writer for john1911.com. Co-Host of the John1911 Podcast. Video content provider for John1911-TV.

Areas of focus: Defense and National Security, Modern Light Weapons, Analysis of the Geo-political / Military Relationship in the Context of Strategic Goals.
Marky Mark

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  • Conner

    Marky, as I’ve mentioned many times on your blog that I have been gunsmithing for years. In my retired years I concentrate on my own collection and I love to buy old and damaged guns to refurb or really firearm that will be a fun project. I am also a traditionalist. Metal and wood baby, the way the lord genius of firearms, Mr. John Browning meant them to be.However, I’m a bit of a hypocrite because I carry most of the time an XD 9mm. Mainly because I don’t want to “scratch” my Browning Hi-Powers even though they make me a much better shooter then I am. For the life of me why would anyone want to Flush Cut a barrel on a 1911 style pistol?? Imo, it is the barrel/bushing matchup that is most or one of the most critical keys to accuracy. Every functioning, moving part in these pistols has been designed to function in unison (smoothly) with all other parts. Weight of the barrel and slide is important. I would think that changing the length or weight of a barrel would also affect inertia which in turn of course messes with timing. It’s tough enough to keep things working correctly regarding timing as it is. First it was skeleton triggers, then lighter hammers, then porting and shave this and shave that. I understand that most folks want to personalize their weapons but I would highly suggest this be done on range guns. Certainly not on something your life may depend on. When we read about the ‘unintended’ legal consequences of doing trigger jobs , I have to think this flushing of barrels could be the same or worse. I feel that “creative gunsmithing”, adding flashy aftermarket replacement parts or even lightning springs to adjust trigger weight (when you don’t know what you’re doing) is all just practice and needs to be thought about very seriously. Your comment is clear and should be enough for anyone to decide against this. This flush cut takes away any chance to recrown a damaged barrell and they ain’t cheap to replace. This has been interesting for sure. Be safe.

    • Couple points.

      The mass removed from the barrel would be negligible from a timing standpoint. I would guess. But I’m sure someone could measure that.

      I don’t see any legal jeopardy in doing the cut outside of product liability.

      The “extra meat” on today’s 1911 barrels IS the upgrade. Notice the image in the video showing 4 barrels. The one on the far right is a WWI dated manufactured Colt 1911 (not a1) and the barrel is functionally flush to the bushing.

      We got away from that for a reason.

      Marky

      • WWI Colt 1911 barrel – bushing setup. See how flush it is? What we do today is “the upgrade”.

        Marky

        https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/101e055563c32981b74754f134b0e97501d5e6adc77245dab4bad40081e6ebf1.jpg

      • Conner

        Marky, one of the first lessons learned in gunsmithing is every action has equal and opposite reaction. Even a negligible change on a ‘picky’ firearm can have consequences sometimes.That is not to argue the point because that’s not what we do here. When extra meat is added something somewhere else is changed as well by design. Say for example heavier mainspring or whatever. I guess I was just giving my opinion on my thinking that if it ain’t broke etc. I’m biased I guess because many times I’ve had to waste time and energy on trying to troubleshoot “kit guns” that will not cycle correctly and of course you can never charge all the time you invest. Regarding the legality of any custom work, or any work for that matter, God forbid if you have to defend yourself with lethal force the first place your weapon goes after you’re arrested is to forensics to be gone through. If a good lawyer can convince an ignorant, anti gun jury that changes made to your gun were done to make it more lethal to kill, then stick a fork in it. Thanks for the chat, and obtw I really like your WWI 1911!
        p.s. what is a barbecue gun?

        • I agree with your on the issues with tweaking designs like the 1911. It’s actually known as “Chasing Function”. Another term, used incorrectly from an engineering standpoint, is “Tolerance Stacking”.

          As for the little bit of material taken off the barrel in this case, while there obviously would be some changes in cycle, the measurements would be so tiny as to be functionally negligible for this application.

          Barbecue Gun: The Second Amendment equivalent of a tuxedo. Something extra nice you wear for special occasions. I have never personally subscribed to the theory but know many who do.

          Marky