WW1 German Helmet Found in Afghanistan

War and history are indelibly intertwined. Which is why many times those who are deep into the firearms culture are also students of history. And this is the best example I have found in recent memory.

While traveling earlier this year (2016) I had a chance to pursue a a fascinating private weapons collection. One thing that grabbed my eye was this helmet located in the GWOT (Global War On Terror) section.

There is a full letter dated and signed by the soldier that brought it back.

There is a full letter dated and signed by the soldier that brought it back.

The owner relayed the story, with documented proof and provenance, that US troops had discovered WWI era German equipment stashed in a cave. As I recall, this stuff was found in 2002 but my mind is fuzzy on that specific information.

Part of "The Great Game" played in Astan early 1900's?

Part of “The Great Game” played in Astan early 1900’s?

But when you look back at the historical record, you very easily see how WWI era arms and equipment ended up in Afghanistan. We are fortunate that some thoughtful folks went to the trouble to not only bring some of it back; but also to write the stories down for future generations.

WW1 German helmet Astan

WW1 German helmet Astan

It is my sincerest hope that the US Government and DOD change their policies and restrictions towards “war trophies” and captured arms being brought stateside. If we don’t preserve this kind of history, stuff like this will be forever lost to the winds of war.

 

 

 

Sincerely,
Marky
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Marky Mark

Marky Mark

Writer at John1911.com
Writer for john1911.com. Co-Host of the John1911 Podcast. Video content provider for John1911-TV.

Areas of focus: Defense and National Security, Modern Light Weapons, Analysis of the Geo-political / Military Relationship in the Context of Strategic Goals.
Marky Mark

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  • Mikial

    That’s very cool. I agree with you that there is a lot of historical support for all sorts of weapons ending up in strange places like Afghanistan.

    While in Iraq we found a Sten, a Sterling and a very battered M1 Garand in various places we did a little treasure hunting. Of course, we couldn’t get them back to the US through any conventional means, so they’re still over there someplace, and I have to be content with the square of carpet I cut out of Saddam’s armored bedroom under the reviewing stand at the famous Baghdad parade grounds where God knows how many people had their pictures taken under the crossed swords.

    • I recall UK soldiers finding lost weapons from the anglo-afghan wars where just about everyone got wiped out. They matched the serial numbers with the MOD and brought them back.

      Marky