M1905 Mk II Ross Rifle Refurb Complete

We picked up a Ross rifle for the armory. We needed something in British 303 and the Canadian Ross came our way. The rifle is in really great shape but had a few stock issues. Upon inspection, I found 3 cracks in the stock. One was structural, the second was iffy, and the third was cosmetic. The metal is in fantastic shape with the correct patina for its age and has no rust or pitting. So, what we have is a rifle that needs minor TLC.

I started out by cleaning the stock up. I went over it gently with alcohol and a soft cotton cloth. I didn’t want to use anything harsh on the finish. I then gently spread the cracks open to allow the AC glue flow into the crack. I clamped it up and hit it with some accelerator to speed up the drying time.

Since the cracks were not major they didn’t need any type of drastic repair. It was a simple fix and not very noticeable. Marky did request that the repairs be noticeable and that the cracks had been repaired. So I did apply a blob of Gap Filling glue to the side repair just to make it obvious. Not very pretty but it lets everyone know its been worked on.

The last thing I did before reassembly was to go over the stock with 2 coats of boiled linseed oil. The wood was dry and needed a fresh coat to restore the original look of the rifle.

 

 

Freeze
www.John1911.com
“Shooting Guns & Having Fun”

Freezer Meat

Freezer Meat

Staff Writer at John1911.com
Writer at John1911.com. Co-Host of the John1911 Podcast.

Freeze is our resident All-American hunter, shooter, gunsmith and military surplus collector. When he is not processing his own game or running the smoker, he focuses on Com-Bloc weapons and Black Powder Shooting.
Freezer Meat

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  • Freeze did a fantastic job on this Ross. And yes to confirm, I did specifically tell him to make one particular crack look repaired. My logic is thus. Of all of the cracks on this rifle, that one is significant and somewhat structural. Which brings up two issues:

    1. A crack that bad hurts the value of the rifle. Sure we could have switched the stocks, but it’s a US marked Ross. That stock NEEDS to stay with that gun. If Freeze repairs it but that repair is not available to the naked eye, the rifle is less valuable since it needs to be, “repaired”. Make sense?

    2. Issue two. The Armory is a real thing. It’s a reference collection and working library of guns. This Ross will be fired. Armory staff need to be able to easily and quickly determine that the repair is stable or holding under use. For the home gamer, that is as simple as knowing your personal rifles. For us, we have so many weapons on the racks, I can’t predict by who or when this rifle will be shot.

    While we keep records of each individual weapon, there is no way we can expect to recall every little detail about every gun 2-3-4 years later without touching it. The “blob crack” repair was significant enough that it warranted it’s own self-evident documentation.

    Anyone who disagrees with this decision are free to start their own website, armory, reference collection and range facilities and do it your way. It’s a free country and you can spent your money how you wish.

    Freeze busted his ass on the Ross and it looks great. “The Blob”, was at my request and I am very happy.

    Marky

  • Chris Weber

    Can you explain what AC glue is by chance? I’ve got two stocks with cracks, one actually has a small piece broken off. Would the AC glue work to reattach it possibly, or is it more for sealing cracks? Thanks.

    • Freeze

      Chris,
      cyanoacrylate glue or more commonly referred to as AC glue. To narrow it down you can see AC glue sold in any store under the name “super glue” but the stuff found in labeled super glue is not Industrial Strength and you don’t want to use it for a stock repair. I use a product called Hot Stuff and it is industrial strength and wicks into smaller cracks very well. Guys who work on guitars and other musical instruments use the same glue. Let me also point out, this is only good for small clean cracks. If you have a break or a major crack you will need to resort to other products that are more epoxy based. Honestly, I would have to see pics of you stocks to see if AC is the way for you to go. I hope the helps.

      • Chris Weber

        Thanks Freeze! I’ll grab some pics when I have time if you don’t mind. One has a piece broken off, sounds like I’ll need something different for it. The other might work with super glue though.

    • Chris Weber
      • This issue is where you’ll need to talk to Freeze.

        Marky

      • Freeze

        Chris, Thats a good one. To do this repair you will need pins and epoxy.

        http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/stock-work-finishing/stock-repair-products/stock-repair-pins/stock-repair-pin-kit-prod617.aspx

        The link is to Brownells and they sell brass pin kits. You don’t actually need an official pin kit but some find it easier. You can buy some brass rod stock and cut it down yourself. Either way will work. As for epoxy, its kind of like dealers choice. Any hardware store carries a wide variety of epoxies that will work. My only suggestion is stay away from expanding glues like gorilla glue. While their clues are awesome, they are not for gun repairs and they don’t hold up to the harsh oils and chemicals.

        Also, the wood looks dirty as all hell. so if you feel you can do this repair yourself make sure you clean the hell out of the wood. I would soak the broken part in acitone for several minutes the scrub it well with a toothbrush. The key to a good bond is to have the wood CLEAN. You have a good project on your hands here, if you decide to tackle it lets know the results.

        • Chris Weber

          It might take me some time to get around to it, but I’ll let you know what happens. Will the acetone take the finish off the wood so it needs to be redone? Thanks for the help, I appreciate it!

          • I am not expert, but I would guess yes on the finish. But it’ll need to be refinished somewhat anyway.

            I know Freeze does wonders with just some oils. Nothing crazy hard.

            Marky

          • Chris Weber

            Well I gotta learn eventually anyway! Thanks for the help, you guys rock.

          • Freeze

            Yes, the action will remove the finish and you will have to refinish the repaired area. You could try to clean the wood in a less invasive way but thats a lot of effort when you are going to be drilling, bonding and sanding. basically with a repair like this either the whole piece will need to be refinished. If you are good and lucky, you will be able to match the orig finish in the repaired area. I hope this helps.

    • Chris Weber

      And this is a Garand with a crack up on the forend and one near the trigger group. I don’t have the small missing piece for that, but I’d like to keep the crack from propagating.

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3e5e1c616563b3465a9265a9fe9115189cd5e2880565e1a6ec9d4a4d839f473d.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/48249e5a94be7692ab042b8938f357c249054b341bd7602cbbd5571fda5b836b.jpg

      • In my uneducated opinion, I think this crack would hold just fine with the glue Freeze is talking about.

        He will be along shortly.

        Marky

      • Freeze

        Chris, the AC glue should work well enough on that crack. Clean it up well and of course you will need to disassemble the rifle to make sure if the crack goes thru to the other side you need to make sure you wick the glue into the whole crack so there are no voids.