First-Light Liberator STT.

Liberator STT Tactical Light

I have had this flashlight for a number of years. I used to use it at work extensively. The construction is a little bit different in that it fit over your hand like some kind of sword hilt or trench knife. But that design makes it damn hard to drop! Back in the day I used to hang out of moving vehicles in bad neighborhoods and this was always on my left hand. You can grab steering wheels, door knobs, rifle for-ends, two handed pistol holds, and even reach out and grab someone should the need arise.

First-Light Liberator STT

First-Light Liberator STT

One has to remember that we didn’t always have the plethora of flashlight and rail options that exist today. And many weapons, especially handguns didn’t have rails. We used to gun fight in the dark, up hill, in 6 feet of snow, both ways! Errr…well… that’s how I remember it. <grins>

But in all seriousness, this light has been my go-to truck / vehicle light for well over a decade. It rides clipped to the passenger side, sun-visor ready to go.  And while I am not bouncing around bad neighborhoods these days, it is comforting to see the light when I get into my truck.

But I have a confession. This is my second Liberator STT light. The first one I bought didn’t have the small reading lamp option. And very quickly I realized I wanted, no needed, that feature to read paperwork in the dark. So I gave the first one away to a co-worker who used it on SWAT callouts (He was running an AK at the time. Yes really) and I picked up the reader-light version.

First-Light Liberator STT.

First-Light. I don’t recall the lumens, but it’s good enough to light up a subject, outdoors a few hundred feet away.

The only negatives I discovered is that the electronics are battery vampires. Even under no use, the little microchip design inside will run down two 123 batteries. I have observed it takes about 6 months. So…time change is battery change. You do change your batteries every 6 months, don’t ya? Yeah, me either.  But in it’s defense, it has 3 levels of brightness, strobe option, momentary and continuous on, reading lamp and even a lockout feature to keep it from AD’ing in a bag. That’s a lot of functionality in such a small package.

It’s a hair too big to carry if you are dressed in civilian clothes, but I have seen tactical teams wear them on body armor as a handsfree light option. Personally I’ve always kept it in my work vehicle. Ready to go and easy to grab regardless if I am driving or standing outside the vehicle. I am not saying it’s the best light out there. Because it is not. Especially when you look at what is available in high-lumen small footprint designs these days. But…if you are looking for something a little more flexible when it comes to gun handling with hand-held lights, it’s still worth a look.

 

 

Marky

www.tacticaltshirts.com

“Shooting Guns & Having Fun”