Remington Rand M1911

I saw this pistol in my local gunshop a little while ago. And while I am an old 1911 guy from way back in the day, I am not a Colt M1911 collector. So frankly, I don’t know exactly what I am looking at here. Let me explain.

Remington Rand M1911 but I had some questions.

I recognize it as a 1911A1 with the arched mainspring housing and relief cuts behind the trigger. And I see the US Government markings as well.

But…why is it 2-tone? Is it a parts gun? And shouldn’t it be parkerized? Not sure. I know Freeze has an old colt that has well over 98% of it’s original bluing intact. Can’t recall if that was a commercial gun or government contract?

In either case, it’s a neat pistol. And even though I am sure the CMP will charge way too much for their 1911s, people will pay for them.

 
Marky
www.John1911.com
“Shooting Guns & Having Fun”

Marky Mark

Marky Mark

Writer at John1911.com
Writer for john1911.com. Co-Host of the John1911 Podcast. Video content provider for John1911-TV.

Areas of focus: Defense and National Security, Modern Light Weapons, Analysis of the Geo-political / Military Relationship in the Context of Strategic Goals.
Marky Mark

Latest posts by Marky Mark (see all)

  • guns2317

    I will take a swing at why it is two tone. I recall in the 80s that two tone guns were all the rage, perhaps around that time one of the gun’s owners either buffed down the frame, or refinished the slide. Or….both? Regardless, doing so cut down on the value of the gun a good bit. With the old Govt issue 1911’s, original finish matters a good bit – to my knowledge. I think the original versions were blued but went to parkerizing for the finish perhaps around WW2.

    I have an original 1911 built 1917 and it has never been refinished, it has a patina to it that is almost shiny along with an assortment of dings, dents, and scratches that show 100 years worth of handling and abuse. It still shoots pretty darn well too, I just wish she could talk.

    The Remington may be worth buying if you can get it for a decent price. I would see if I could get it blued to match the slide, if someone could make the frame look just as weathered as the slide currently is.

    Just my $.02 worth.

    • I had forgotten about the TJ Hooker days and 2-tone guns. I suspect you are correct.

      Marky

  • James Dallas Teel II

    It’s for sure a government issue pistol, but what happened to it after it left government control is anyone’s guess. I suspect it’s been rebuilt more than once and that in and of itself would account for the difference in finishes, not that it’s been purposely “two-toned”.

    • Yeah. But the difference is striking on this one. I’ve already got a WWI 1911 that is a basket case. So I passed on this.

      They were pretty proud of it.

      Marky

  • Mikial

    Based on the serial number it was part of a run of 72,795 1911’s built by Remington Rand in 1944, that included serial numbers 1743847 through 1816641. Since the slide is clearly marked Remington Rand, I’ll take a SWAG and say it could very well be the original slide and a previous owner had some work done on the slide that included refinishing it, although without some solid evidence that it is indeed the original slide it’s impossible to say for certain.

    • I think we had someone e-mail they bought a Rand from DCM that looked like this from them! We are trying to get photos.

      Marky

  • MickeyG

    Shoot it and have some fun. I don’t care what weapons look like as long as they function as they are supposed to !

    • Yes. There are very few 1911s that are actually irreplaceable.

      Kinda happens that way when a country makes millions of a particular firearm.

      Marky