Ruger’s Incredible Single Six Convertible Revolver

Ruger’s Single Six Convertible revolver comes with two interchangeable cylinders so you can shoot either .22 Long Rifle or .22 WMR cartridges in it. It’s also my single most favorite plinking revolver–specifically the “Super” variant because it has adjustable sights.

The original Single Six Convertible was made from 1962 to 1972 and is found with 4 5/8, 5 1/2, 6 1/2 or 9 1/2-inch barrels. The 4 5/8 inch one is very rare, and the 9 1/2 inch one is just ungainly.

The Super Single Six was made from 1964 to 1972 and came only with either 5 1/2 or 6 1/2-inch barrels.

Some of you may know that the .22 Long Rifle and .22 WMR are actually two different bullet diameters even though they’re both .22s. The .22 Long Rifle is a “heeled” bullet, meaning it has an undersize shank seated into the case and the exposed part of the bullet is the same diameter as the outside of the case–.223-inch. The .22 WMR, on the other hand, uses a conventional jacketed bullet that’s .224-inch.

While it’s perfectly safe to fire the .22 Long Rifle’s smaller bullet down the larger .224-inch bore, the reverse is not necessarily true. That being the case, and to prevent any possible in-factory mix up with undersize bores, all Ruger .22 revolvers have .224-inch bores regardless of whether they’re convertibles or not.

in-flight: As you can see in this high-speed photo, the heel of the soft .22 Long Rifle bullet is “bumped up” during the pressure of firing to fill the bore.

in-flight: As you can see in this high-speed photo, the heel of the soft .22 Long Rifle bullet is “bumped up” during the pressure of firing to fill the bore.

 

 

Scott Mayer

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“Shooting Guns & Having Fun”

Scott Mayer

Scott Mayer

Writer at John1911
Mayer began his outdoor industry career in 1993 on the NRA Technical Staff where he became American Rifleman magazine first Shooting Editor. Mayer left NRA and entered the business end of publishing in 2003 as Advertising Account Executive for Safari Club International SAFARI Magazine and Safari Times newspaper. In 2006, Mayer was named Publisher of Shooting Times magazine where he was also tasked with launching and leading Personal Defense TV, the first television show of its kind.

In 2008, Mayer returned to the editorial side of publishing, this time in the digital field, as Editorial Director for Guns & Ammo, Shooting Times, Handguns and Rifleshooter online magazines. After a brief stint in 2011 as the Digital Media Director for an ABC TV affiliate, Mayer returned to the outdoors industry and Safari Club International where he is currently Assistant Publisher and Multi-Media Communications Editor.
Scott Mayer

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